3 Things Wheelchair Users Wished Able-Bodied People Understood - Assurance Mobility
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3 Things Wheelchair Users Wished Able-Bodied People Understood

Here at Assurance Mobility, we strive to make sure that the voices of those who are often ignored are heard. After all, society tends to barter with those who meet the ideal definition of beauty and this can leave people who are ‘different’ in one way or another feeling excluded. In fact, wheelchair users often wish that able-bodied individuals would take the time to recognise their position of power and use it to help others. Read on as we go over three things that wheelchair users want others to know about their disability…

  1. A wheelchair does not define me

Although the intention is often not malicious, people are often defined by their differences. As a result, wheelchair users tend to be characterised by their chair and it becomes a part of their identity whether they like it or not. it is important that able-bodied people remember that wheelchair users have their own interests, opinions and hobbies that are not limited by their chair.

  1. Treat me like you treat everyone else

Perhaps the most misunderstood action that people make around wheelchair users is providing assistance when none has been asked for. After all, able-bodied people tend not to question the abilities of those in a chair and presume that they require special treatment at all times. In reality, wheelchair users often want to be treated like everybody else in society, with certain exceptions like ramps and wheelchair lifts to allow easy access to public buildings.

  1. Representation in popular media is important

In recent years, the conversation around representation has become a hot topic for debate. Many able-bodied people take offence with these requests because they can seem imposing, however it is vital to remember that 99% of the media idealises a beauty that does not involve a chair. By portraying wheelchair uses in popular media, it shows children and adults that may be in a similar situation that they are just as strong and capable as their walking counterparts.

When it comes to using a wheelchair, whether it be on a temporary or permanent basis, it is important that able-bodied individuals put themselves in the shoes of those who may require a set of wheels to get around. After all, wheelchair users have their own career ambitions, personal lives and interests too! To find out more information about disability recognition, get in contact with the best wheelchairs Manchester has to offer and speak to a member of the Assurance Mobility team today!

About the Author:

Phil Collins

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